COMMON CONDITIONS

The information outlined below on common conditions and treatments of the foot and ankle is provided as a guide only and it is not intended to be comprehensive. Discussion with Mr Kumar is important to answer any questions that you may have.

For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

The Achilles tendon (or heel cord) is the thick strap that can be felt running down the back of the calf into the heel. The tendon is made up of many bundles or fibres of a strong material called collagen, which is the body’s main tissue building block. It is attached to, and worked by, the large muscles that make up the calf (gastrocnemius and soleus). When the Achilles tendon pulls on the heel it makes us go up on tiptoe, or pushes us forwards when walking or running. If this tendon is not working it is difficult to walk and the ankle feels weak.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Achilles Tendon Disorders here.

The function of the heel in walking is to absorb the shock of your foot striking the ground as it is put down and to start springing you forward on the next step. It contains a strong bone (the calcaneum). Under the bone are a large number of small pockets of fat in strong elastic linings, which absorb much of the shock (fat pads). The heel is attached to the front of the foot by a number of strong ligaments which run between the front part of the calcaneum and various other parts of the foot. The strongest ligament is the plantar fascia, which attaches the heel to the toes and helps to balance the various parts of the foot as you walk. It therefore takes a lot of stress as you walk.

In some people the plantar fascia becomes painful and inflamed. This usually happens where it is attached to the heel bone, although sometimes it happens in the mid-part of the foot. This condition is called plantar fascitis.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Plantar Fascitis here.

Surgery for a bunion may be advised if simple measures, such as well-fitting shoes, simple painkillers and padding do not relieve the discomfort of the bunion. It is only appropriate if you are willing to be realistic about footwear after surgery, and understand and accept the potential problems of the procedure.

Read More About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Bunions here.

Discussion with Mr Kumar is important to answer any questions that you may have. For information about any additional conditions not featured within the site, please contact us for more information.

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